Sound of Charlotte Blog

Thanking our Veterans with Vet Tix

November 11, 2015

We are proud to partner with Veteran Tickets Foundation to provide tickets for members of the military and their families for select concerts. Providing these tickets for veterans is only a small way that we express our appreciation for their service to our country. We recently received notes of their gratitude in attending a symphony performance, but the pleasure is all ours!

Thank you Vet Tix and Charlotte Symphony for allowing my family to reconnect and enjoy our first symphony. It was a wonderful production and was thoroughly enjoyed. We loved it and will be back. - Sonya, United States Army Veteran, 1983-1990

Thank you Charlotte Symphony and Vet Tix for the wonderful evening with my wife. The movie and the orchestra was extraordinary and beautiful. - David, United States Air Force Veteran, 1978-1982

I want to send a big Thank You to the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra...I can't not explain how much I enjoyed the performance. I left the Belk Theater wanting to sing and dance all over the streets of Uptown! - Erin, United States Air Force Veteran, 1996-2012

Thank you Charlotte Symphony and Vet Tickets, it was a wonderful evening. It was like stepping back in time and seeing not only how complex movie making was, but how magical a trip to the cinema could be... Again thank you for the magical evening. - Melinda, United States Army, Currently Serving

I really would like to thank the Charlotte Symphony for the great seats! My wife and I were excited at the opportunity to attend the show... What a great performance by the Charlotte Symphony to have their timing executed flawlessly with the movie. - Patrick, United States Marine Corps Veteran, 1986-1995

It is so nice to have the opportunity to make these events into memories with my family. It means a lot to us to make up for lost times. Thank y Read more

High School Choral Students to Debut with Charlotte Symphony

November 5, 2015

Seven local high school choral students will experience the thrill of performing live with the Charlotte Symphony November 19-21, 2015 at Belk Theater at Blumenthal Performing Arts Center.

The concerts, which feature the Fauré Requiem, will mark the debut of the 2015-2016 Young Artists in Residence program, a new immersive choral initiative of the Charlotte Symphony Chorus.

Students who won auditions come from Charlotte-Mecklenburg and Gaston County schools and have spent the last two months rehearsing the Requiem weekly with the Charlotte Symphony Chorus. "It has been a pleasure to work with these fine young musicians," says Kenney Potter, director of choruses for the Charlotte Symphony. "This is a great opportunity for them to perform Fauré's choral masterwork in a professional-caliber setting with the Charlotte Symphony and Charlotte Symphony Chorus."

Watch this video to hear what some of the Young Artists have to say about this unique experience.

The 2015-2016 Charlotte Symphony Chorus Young Artists in Residence are:
Jacob Dyksterhouse, bass, Stuart W. Cramer High School
Claire Houlihan, alto, Northwest School of the Arts
Hannah Keel, soprano, South Point High School
Matthew Noneman, bass, Providence High School
Trinity Sanford, soprano, Northwest School of the Arts
Stephenie Santilli, alto, Northwest School of the Arts
Nathalie Schlesinger, alto, Providence High School

Posted in Classics.

Homecoming for Midshipman Adam Thomas

October 13, 2015

When the 70-member U.S. Naval Academy Men's Glee Club drops anchor in Charlotte over Veteran's Day weekend, November 13-14, one of its singers will feel right at home.

Midshipman 4th Class Adam Thomas is a June 2015 graduate of South Mecklenburg High School and says he's ecstatic about the opportunity to continue his music education at the Naval Academy. "I have many fond memories of performing in the Charlotte area, and I am looking forward to performing with the Symphony," says Thomas. "Even more important, I am excited to bring some of my new friends at the Academy home to Charlotte and let them enjoy some true southern hospitality!"

A Salute to America's Heroes promises a patriotic program honoring all who have served and are serving our country. This talented group of midshipmen perform a wide range of sacred music and American spirituals, plus the famous "Naval Hymn," "Battle Hymn of the Republic," "Ave Maria," and more! 

Conductor Albert-George Schram has collaborated with the Men's Glee Club on three previous occasions in Charlotte, Columbus, and Nashville and is excited once again to be working with one of America's premier men's choral ensembles.

"I am deeply proud and honored to be able to bring these highly talented young men to Charlotte and introduce them to our Symphony and our audience," says Schram. "This Glee Club is extraordinary, and together with our Symphony, they will provide attendees with an evening of music they will long remember."

For more information, click here.

Posted in Pops.

WDAV Presents New Charlotte Symphony Weekly Features

October 2, 2015

Want to hear more of the Charlotte Symphony outside of the concert hall? Our friends at WDAV are making that happen with two new weekly features!
Tune in at 11 a.m. every Thursday for "The CSO Spotlight," when you'll hear highlights from Symphony concerts and can learn about upcoming performances. On weeks we have a Classics series concert, you'll also hear a short interview with Music Director Christopher Warren-Green.  This feature runs the full duration of the 2015-2016 season.
On Saturdays at 3 p.m., "The Charlotte Symphony: In Performance" offers complete concerts from recent seasons. You can expect to hear recordings from Classics series concerts that have also been featured on Carolina Live, as well others from the current and previous seasons. This feature begins on October 3 and runs through March. Click here for the schedule.
As always, thank you to Frank Dominguez and all our friends at 89.9 WDAV.

Winterfield Program kicks off with a concert!

September 16, 2015

Bright and early on Monday, September 14, Winterfield Elementary students in grades 2-5 sat on the gymnasium floor, wriggling with anticipation for the presentation. The students were treated to performances from a Charlotte Symphony quintet featuring selections ranging from Also Sprach Zarathustra to the theme from Super Mario Bros.

Monday's show was an exciting kick-off to the sixth year of the successful partnership between the Symphony and Winterfield , where students participate in a free after school music program. The intent was to raise interest in the Winterfield Youth Orchestra, to encourage new enrollment, and celebrate North Carolina's "Arts in Education" week. 
Students stared in awe at the various instruments--violin, cello, flute, clarinet, and trumpet--all available through the Winterfield program. Students also listened, wide-eyed, to demos by winds instructor Michael Sanders and strings instructor Taddes Korris, and danced in their seats to a percussion demo (that included a call-and-response game) by bucket band leader Fred Dunlap.
A special thank you to everyone who participated in the program:
CSO Musicians: Jenny Topilow, violin; Sarah Markle, cello; Taddes Korris, bass; Dru DeVan, clarinet; Andrew Fierova, horn
WYO Teachers: Fred Dunlap, Percussion and Bucket Band; Michael Sanders, Winds
Winterfield Staff: Anna Helms Kennington, Community in Schools; Courtney Hollenbeck, teacher and founder of the school's youth orchestra program, Nancy Bain, music teacher.

Post written by Phoebe Lustig, School Programs Manager

5 Questions With: John Goberman

September 10, 2015

John Goberman is a legendary name in performing arts circles. Probably best known as the creator of Live From Lincoln Center, Goberman developed the audio-video technology for telecasting live arts performances without audience or performer disruption and has earned tons of accolades (including Emmy and Peabody Awards) for his work in the arts.

Goberman also created a series of film-and-concert presentations called Symphonic Night at the Movies with many orchestras, including the Charlotte Symphony.

We kick off our 2015-2016 Pops series with a presentation of Singin' in the Rain September 18 and 19 at 8 p.m. in Belk Theater. 

We caught up with Mr. Goberman before he joins us in Charlotte for Singin' in the Rain next weekend.

Charlotte Symphony: So how did the idea of Symphonic Night at the Movies come to you?
John Goberman: It all started with Alexander Nevsky, the great Prokofiev/Eisenstein cowboys-and-Indians Hollywood western, which they converted into a Russians-and-Germans non-esoteric thrilling picture with the best film score ever written. It turned out to be the worst film score recording ever, which is why I thought it would be great to have a real orchestra play it--live--and figured out ways to do that, which we premiered in Los Angeles with Andre Previn.

CS: Why was that important to implement when you did?
JG: Because there was a period of Hollywood filmmaking that used symphonic music, I thought there might be some other films where the live presence and sound of a symphony orchestra would fill (at least the composer's) concept of the music. The Wizard of Oz, Singin' in the Rain, Psycho, Casablanca--they're all films in which the music is extremely important to the experience. The presence of an orchestra turns the event into a performance of a film, instead of just a screening of a film.

CS: Seems complicated. How exactly will Conductor Albert-George Schram coordinate all of this?   
JG: I like to think that this experience for the conductor and orchestra is very much like playing an opera--when there's give and take between the performers and orchestra--except here there is no give. The conductor will be accompanying the singers on the screen just as he would in an opera. And while there is no "adjusting" coming from the screen singers--you can be sure they will do it the same every time! Same with the dancers.

CS: So, does the orchestra rehearse with the movie on? How do they prepare?
JG: Yes. The orchestra and conductor can prepare completely in advance by studying a DVD prepared for them. The study DVD contains all the visual elements of the performance, plus the dialog, vocal and sound effect tracks, without the music (as it will be in the performance) and also the original tracks with the music so he knows he is correct. There is also a clock, an analog clock with a sweep hand, which he uses as a guide so that the music is accompanying the picture correctly (a certain time at a certain point marked in the score).

CS: How did you get into the field of music production? Did you study music? 
JG: I used to be a cellist, and then I started the Live from Lincoln Center television series, which I produced until recently. But I have always had an affection for my live orchestra presentations of film. It is an audience experience and a musical experience that allows the work of some great composers to be heard fully, in context.

Click here to watch a Singin' in the Rain with live orchestra video. 

For more information and to purchase tickets, click here.

Post written by Virginia Brown

Posted in Pops.

Giving back to our community

August 18, 2015

By Cabir Kansupada
The Charlotte Symphony Orchestra (CSO) has a long history of giving back to the community. During the summer of 2014, I volunteered at the Winterfield Elementary music camp sponsored by the CSO. While assisting professional musicians in teaching the classes, I was inspired by the confidence these students gained as they learned an instrument for the first time. Sensing a need, I organized student mentors to encourage and empower fellow student musicians. We were all brought together by the same desire: to help other students experience the thrill of music.
The Instruments for Kids program, sponsored by the CSO, accepts used instruments and repairs damaged ones to donate to music programs such as the one at Winterfield Elementary. The Tri-M Music Honors Society at my high school supports young artists to experience creativity, friendship, and expression though music. At our first pizza fundraiser, we raised over one hundred dollars to contribute to the Instruments for Kids program! We were ecstatic to see our efforts encourage the next wave of eager musicians and, like the CSO, give back to our community.

Cabir Kansupada is a senior at Charlotte Country Day School and a Charlotte Symphony Youth Orchestra violinist.

Posted in Education & Community, Youth Orchestras.

Charlotte Symphony Musicians Stay Busy This Summer!

July 20, 2015

As soon as the Charlotte Symphony's Summer Pops series ends on July 3, many of the CSO's musicians head out of Charlotte for exciting and highly sought-after gigs elsewhere in the U.S. Keep tabs on where these talented musicians are headed! 
Benjamin Geller, principal viola
For the first time, Benjamin Geller will be performing at Greensboro's Eastern Music Festival for six weeks, from June 27 through August 1. For more information on the Triad's annual festival, visit
Aubrey Foard, principal tuba
From mid-July through early August, Aubrey Foard will serve for the second year as an artist faculty member at Brevard Music Center in Brevard, NC. He then heads out west to perform as principal tubist at Britt Festival in Jacksonville, Oregon. 
Jon Lewis, cello
Jon Lewis will be performing principal cello for Central City Opera for 6 weeks from July 1 to August 9. Central City Opera is the fifth oldest opera company in the country, located in Central City, Colorado.
Calin Lupanu, concertmaster & Monica Boboc, violin
Husband-and-wife Calin Lupanu and Monica Boboc will again join the Colorado Music Festival as violinists in the orchestra in Boulder, Colorado. Lupanu serves as concertmaster and Chamber Music Coordinator. 
Tim Hudson, acting second trumpet
Tim Hudson will spend part of his summer as artist/faculty for the Grand Valley International Trumpet Seminar in Michigan. 
Cynthia Frank, viola
For the last 25 years, Cynthia Frank has spent her summers at the Chautauqua Institution in western New York, playing with the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, which she refers to as her "second family." The nearly 200-year-old institution is a learning center with courses in art, music, dance, theatre, writing, and more.
Learn more about Charlotte Symphony musicians and conductors.

CSO Clarinetist Gene Kavadlo Honored at Alma Mater

May 21, 2015

Congratulations to our longtime principal clarinetist, Gene Kavadlo, who has been named this year's John Castellini award winner!

The award is named for John Castellini, founder of the Queens College Choral Society, and it is presented annually to a distinguished alumnus or alumna who, as an undergraduate, performed with the Choral Society.

Kavadlo earned his music degree from Queens College in New York in 1967. During his time at the college, John Castellini was one of his professors. "Castellini had a very long and distinguished career at Queens College," says Kavadlo. "... Several times during my college career, when I had received some sort of recognition, Castellini's response was always, 'They've made a terrible mistake.' "

When Castellini retired to Jacksonville, Florida, Kavadlo was principal clarinetist for that orchestra and the two became close. "I actually got to know him as an adult, rather than the formal student/teacher relationship," Kavadlo says, "and I discovered that he was charming, witty, and had a great sense of humor."

Kavadlo and his wife, Ali, took a road trip to New York to attend the Choral Society performance on Saturday, May 16, where he was recognized. He closed his acceptance remarks that evening by telling the audience that he was sure Castellini was looking down on the event, thinking the school had made a terrible mistake!

When he's not busy performing with the Charlotte Symphony, Kavadlo enjoys spending time with his family, seeing movies, and performing klezmer music with his band, Viva Klezmer! Kavadlo and his klezmer music were recently featured in an issue of Charlotte magazine.

Meet Kiffen Loomis

April 24, 2015

The 28th annual Youth Festival takes place on Wednesday, April 29 at 7:30 p.m. at Belk Theater. This annual concert highlights the talents of the Charlotte Symphony Youth Orchestra (CSYO), the Junior Youth Orchestra (JYO) and the grand-prize winner of the senior division of the  Symphony Guild of Charlotte 's annual Young Artists Competition.

This year's winner this year is Kiffen Loomis, who is 16 and lives in Asheville, NC. He's a pianist who's been playing since age five. Get to know this talented young man!

How were you introduced to the piano?
As a 3 and 4 year-old, I would sit under the piano as my older brother practiced. Hearing each hammer strike the string, and seeing his foot guide the pedal up and down fascinated me. By the age of 5, I was ready to crawl up from under the piano, and play it for myself.

Name a performer you respect.
Glenn Gould is one of the most enthralling pianists of the last century. His attention to detail, in combination with his fearless interpretation of the hallmark works, demands great respect.

What piece would you love to perform?
Bach's Goldberg Variations carry with them a divine character, making them stunningly beautiful, yet daunting. I would love to study the work, but question whether I would ever be able to perform it. 

What other contests/awards have you won? 
I have won the North Carolina Symphony's Junior Kathleen Price and Joseph M. Bryan Youth Concerto Competition, the Winston-Salem Symphony's Peter Perret Youth Talent Search, the Hendersonville Symphony Young Artist Concerto Competition, the junior division of the Charlotte Symphony Guild's Young Artist Competition, and eight first-place awards at the statewide competitions hosted by the NCFMC.

What else we should know about you?
I serve as president of the Western North Carolina region of the Order of the Arrow, part of the Boy Scouts of America. I devote much of my time to promoting leadership development among those in my region, and serving the community as a whole. In addition to my BSA interests, I play on my high school's varsity tennis team.

I also lead an organization called Notes from the Soul. NFS is a group of student musicians from WNC who performed for over 2,000 children in elementary schools and after-school programs this year. The group exposes its listeners to different types of music and promotes musical interchange among the children and young adults who perform.

Do you know what you'd like to study in college? 

I would like to study Nuclear Physics while maintaining my piano studies. This summer I will be working in the TUNL Research Institute for Nuclear Physics at Duke University and hope to determine whether nuclear physics is indeed my calling.

Posted in Youth Orchestras.

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